Scott Morris: Mapping the Multilateral Concessional Finance Landscape

On September 19, the Center for Global Development will convene representatives from the leading multilateral development funds, their donors and recipients, and independent experts to discuss the next round of negotiations that will determine how much money these funds will have available in the years ahead and how they will spend it. To better inform the upcoming gathering, we’ve prepared a mapping note of the multilateral funds: how much money they raise, from whom, and how they spend it.

Between April 2019 and December 2020, an unprecedented number of multilateral and thematic funds will undergo a concentration of replenishments without the gap that separated previous cycles. In addition to the older multilateral funds such as the International Development Association (IDA), the African Development Fund (AfDF), and the Asian Development Fund (AsDF), the growth of newer funds such as Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi) and the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) and the entrance of new funds such as the Global Financing Facility (GFF) and the Green Climate Fund (GCF) will enhance competition between funds vying for resources. This timeline, along with global changes in the concessional financing landscape, promises to create new challenges for this upcoming round of replenishments.

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Scott Morris is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development and director of the US Development Policy Initiative. In addition to managing the center’s work on US development policy, his research addresses development finance issues, debt policy, governance issues at international financial institutions like the World Bank and IMF, and China’s role as a development actor.